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Konstantin Bespalov
Konstantin Bespalov

Hp 8610 Ink Best Buy



The best HP printer we've tested is the HP Color LaserJet Pro MFP M479fdw. This color laser all-in-one feels remarkably well-built, and its design allows easy access to toner cartridges and paper jams. Its ADF-equipped scanner scans up to 25 pages per minute, and it can scan double-sided sheets in a single pass, so you don't need to flip the pages manually. Connectivity options include Wi-Fi, USB, and Ethernet, and it supports Apple AirPrint and Mopria Print Service. A mobile app is available for Android and iOS devices, which you can use to print, scan, copy, or perform maintenance tasks.




hp 8610 ink best buy


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The HP OfficeJet Pro 9025e is our best mid-range pick and one of the best HP printers for home use we've tested. It's an all-in-one inkjet model with an excellent cartridge system. It yields around 1100 black and 700 color pages, which you can further increase with XL cartridges. It also accepts third-party ink cartridges, which might help you save more money, and this model comes with six months of ink through HP's Instant Ink subscription, a service that delivers ink to you when the printer detects low ink levels. Its overall printing speed is great at around 16 black or 14 color pages per minute, and it can print double-sided automatically.


In addition to Wi-Fi, USB, and Ethernet connectivity, you can print directly from a USB flash drive. The scanner has many features, including an automatic document feeder, duplex scanning capability (single-pass), and optical character recognition (OCR). OCR lets you scan documents into text files, making it easier to edit or search for keywords. Unfortunately, the scan quality is sub-par, so it isn't the best for digitizing photos. It prints outstanding quality documents and very detailed photos with reasonable color accuracy, albeit with a little bit of graininess in the pictures. The design allows easy access to paper jams and ink cartridges, and the power cord is removable, so it's easy to replace if it gets damaged.


The biggest drawback of this model is its page yield. Its black and tri-color cartridges yield only about 100 black and 40 color prints, meaning you'll have to replace them regularly. Also, since it only has a tri-color cartridge, you'll have to replace the whole cartridge even if only one color runs out. Its printing speed is slow at five black or three color pages per minute, so it isn't the best for printing long papers or essays. It prints surprisingly good-looking photos with adequate color accuracy, but it's best to avoid printing too many photos, as you'll end up spending more money on replacement ink than the printer itself.


I am convinced this model was poorly designed and doesn't represent HP's reputation for having the best printers on the market. Being an HP employee and giving a gift to my wife that was DOA was embarrassing and not acceptable. Now with having this error being showed after replacing the color cartridges for the first time, and needing to print important documents right now is even more unacceptable, not to mention my wife's opinion which I have to now reverse.


Wow. Three months later and HP hasn't answered this question. I just spent over $100 on four new ink cartridges for my HP OfficeJet Pro 8610--all genuine HP cartridges purchased from reputable stores (two from Staples, two from Best Buy), and now I get a constant error message that the BRAND NEW, GENUINE HP yellow and cyan cartridges "appear to be damaged." Staples and Best Buy won't take the cartridges back--no returns on open cartridges, and HP doesn't appear willing to address the issue. The only thing I've gleaned by my Google search is that HP "updated" the firmware on these printers to attempt to stop people from using third-party remanufactured cartridges, and in the process, a lot of "older" production model cartridges from HP's own factories no longer work either.


I am dealing with a customers HP Officejet Pro 8610 printer which has the problem of rejecting Black ink cartridges and I replaced 2 failed new 3rd party cartridges with 2 HP brand cartridges, one a Standard and one an XL from 2 different suppliers, both of which were also rejected.I contacted HP to find out why and was taken through the full printer reset which involves pulling out the power lead and then holding your finger on the power button (at the front) for 30 seconds then releasing, then plugging it back in and pressing the power button as normal to switch it on. However, this made no difference.I was told to remove the printhead using the lever to the right and to clean the contacts on the printhead and the printer as well as clean the undersid of the printhead where the ink comes out, but none of this made any difference.They would not say whether or not they had done a firmware update and all the manufacturers are unsure of whether or not they have done one, due to an unpresidented influx of complaints about failed ink cartridges including HP's own brand.HP will only stick to the printhead requiring replacing and will not undertake any free replacement if the 1 year warranty (purchase date) has expired, their system will automatically block it by its serial number.Here is the big problem, all these printers seem to be rejecting various cartridges just outside the 1 year warranty period, which suggests that they have either built in obsolescence, built substandard printheads or a firmware update has purposely caused the printheads to no longer work. I know the last one is a conspiracy theory, but Epson were once responsible for using Online Support (SX models) to collect information directly from customers printers and then killed the microchip on any 3rd party cartridge that was detected, this was proven because uninstalling online support solved the problem!Up until a few days ago, I have been adamant that HP have done a firmware update causing cartridge rejection, but because customers are getting a different variation of failed cartridges, it is possible that they are sending a shut down code to the printhead firmware which shuts down the communication for the colour/colours of the last inks changed, after the printer has had at least 1 years usage.The only reason I can see for this is the extra revenue from printhead sales.It would be good if somebody knows an electronics engineer that used to work with these sort of systems and could provide information about this?[Content Removed]. I think it's too much to accept that all these printheads have failed after 1 year and a month or two and nevertheless, would not say much for the advertised quality of HP products.If anyone knows of something they did that caused their printer to start accepting the previously failed ink cartridges, they should also post that information here?You see, on most printers there is a sequence of buttons that can be pressed to perform various maintenance & resetting tasks, even when the printer has only one button as this model does, it can be held for X time, released for X time, pressed X amount of times etc. sometimes with power on, sometimes unplugged and sometimes plugged in whilst holding a button. As soon as I find out anything that helps further I will post it here.


[content removed] There tactics seem underhanded at the least. I have the same issue-I have the 8610. Cartridges working fine, approx 3/4 full of ink and then BOOM - "cartridge appears damaged"! I don't think so. This is typical of all the HP printers I have ever owned.


i did have an officejet pro 8610 printer that is no more, but i have a bunch of the printer inks on hand.i went to best buy and staples to look for a substitue printer that uses the same inks but was told that the 8610 has been replaced by 8710. I could not return the inks as they are past 30 days and i do not have the reciept any longer.


"Which printer cartridges codes are compatible with my printer? Which printer uses the cheapest ink cartridge? Use this chart to decide which is the best printer to buy. All of the latest inkjet printers are listed below, with the cheapest at the top, working to the most expensive at the bottom." 041b061a72


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